First Look at Only God Forgives, Boy Walks Out on Girls, the Digital Public Library, Magic Mike in Space, Arrested Development, Mad Men vs. History, and a New Hollywood Novel / by Lars Garvey Laing-Peterson

The first trailer for Only God Forgives, the follow up to Nicolas Winding Refn and Ryan Gosling's last collaboration, Drive, dropped today. Other than learning that Gosling's character was "different" and "strange," even in the womb (and was almost aborted!), the trailer doesn't reveal too much about the story, but the characters, camera work, atmosphere, and mood are definitely intriguing. Hopefully another trailer will arrive shortly. The film debuts at Cannes next month.

Girls appears to have suffered a bit of a set back (and not in the writing room, for once). Christopher Abbott, the actor who portrays Charlie, is reported (by IndieWire, quoting from the New York Post) to have left the show as Girls started production on its third season. As I gave up on the show (at least for the moment) halfway through the second season, I did not see Charlie start to monopolize some serious screen time, but apparently he did. Something about an app. Wonder how the show will handle his departure. If anyone can make an awkward, exasperating mess out of the situation, one that the LA Review of Books will be sure to call brilliant, it's Lena Dunham.

On 18 March, the National Digital Public Library will be launched, according to the New York Review of Books. The DPLA "is a project to make the holdings of America's research libraries, archives, and museums available to all Americans—and eventually to everyone in the world—online and free of charge." As Robert Darnton writes, "It may be a small step, but it will be a pragmatic advance into the world of knowledge, which Jefferson, in a utopian vein, described as 'the common property of mankind.'" Looking forward to exploring the DPLA when it launches in two weeks.

Matthew McConaughey, everyone's favorite man to see shirtless, is slated to star in Christopher Nolan's Interstellar, which will involve space and time travel, multiple dimensions, and a bit of riffing on the theoretical physics of Kip Thorne. As the Guardian reveals, somewhat unsurprisingly, the film is "reportedly complex and multilayered," which is about par for the course for the siblings who brought us The Prestige and Inception. It'll be interesting to see how McConaughey, riding high on a wave of positive critical reception, will fit into Nolan's film, and who the director will fit around him. Is it too much to hope for David Bowie? I mean, the film does involve space travel.

A date has finally been set for Arrested Development's return: 26 May 2013. The new season has also been expanded to 15 episodes, up from the originally planned 10. According to IndieWire, "Due to budget reasons and the fact that the cast is now considerably more famous and harder to book all at once, the new episodes were written to each focus on a particular character's journey since the end of the show, with the family... reportedly only really reunited in full at the end." I'm curious how this plays out. Curious and worried.

Eventually some jerk was going to do this, and apparently that jerk is Mallory Russell of Business Insider: a comparison of the ads created in Mad Men and the real ads from the 1960s. Pretty interesting, to be honest, if only because it adds yet another level to the reimagining and replication of the 1960s in the show. Were the ads created to look like how people today remember/imagine the 1960s being, or were they based on the actual ads from the time period? I'm leaning towards the former rather than the latter.

And to prove that I don't just bash the LA Review of Books, a fantastic review/essay by Richard Rayner on Matthew Spektor's Hollywood novel, American Dream Machine. My second semester of graduate school I did a lengthy research paper on Los Angeles Noir. The opening paragraph of Rayner's piece alone was enough to get my attention, and the rest has sold me on Spektor's book. Adding it to the list of novels to tackle once I finish my MA studies next month.